Injustice Update.

I was so pleased to receive an  email today that I couldn’t wait to share.

Dear David,

I’ve just had some incredibly exciting news on the case of Kris Maharaj, the Brit who has already spent 33 unjust years in Florida’s prison system for a murder he did not commit.

Kris will finally have an evidentiary hearing on October 17th.

The meaning of that might not be initially obvious, but I assure you it’s a very significant development. It’s one I have been pushing for, for a long time.

It means that Kris finally has the chance to prove in a US federal court that he should not have been deprived of his liberty for more than three decades, let alone have been sentenced to death.

I’ve been involved in more than 400 capital cases over the years, and Kris’ is the greatest injustice of them all.

Evidence uncovered in 2014 proved beyond doubt that Kris is not guilty of the murders for which he has been imprisoned. The state trial court nevertheless refused to order a new trial at the time. That’s why I’ve been pushing for a Federal evidentiary hearing.

When I took on this case back in 1993, I had no grey hairs. Twenty-six years on, you’d be hard pushed to find a hair on my head that isn’t grey or white – and a fair number of them have been caused by the traumas of Kris’ case.

But just imagine the impact of the last 33 years on Kris and his wife Marita.

It is hard to believe that we could get justice after all the crushing disappointments we’ve been through over the years, but perhaps – just perhaps – Kris will finally come home for his first Christmas in more than three decades.

The possibility of justice would never have arisen were it not for the kindness of all his supporters.

Both Kris and Marita have said their hope wouldn’t have lasted this long without the support they get from the Reprieve community.

It’s going to be a busy month ahead as I prepare for this hearing, but the Campaigns team at Reprieve will be in touch to update you in the run-up to the 17th October.

Thank you, as always, for your support of Reprieve so we can help many people like Kris and Marita.

Clive Stafford Smith
Co-founder
Reprieve
Donate to help more people like Kris

We fight over months, years, and – in the case of people like Kris – decades, to secure justice for victims of human rights abuses. Reprieve supporters like you are a huge part of the team that keeps going and going until the battle is won.

Could you join the fight for justice for people like Kris by making a donation today ➝

I thank you for the interest shown by you all in the original post I did on this case. I’d like  to think that one of you was able to help.

Hugs to you all                                                                                                                                             David

 

About davidprosser

Retired Local Government Officer who started to write at age 60 and hasn't looked back. Writes a humorous diary on the life of a member of the gentry.......and the village he lives in with his sadistic early morning alarm cat Oscar and his wife the formidable Lady J.
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21 Responses to Injustice Update.

  1. Scottie says:

    Hello David. Thank you for sharing the news. I am stunned that proof of being innocent of the charged crime is not an automatic immediate release from prison. Too much money in the system of detaining people, and too much pride for some to admit they were wrong. How do you ever make up for 33 of basically being kidnapped and held against your will. Especially in US prisons which are designed to be punitive hellscapes. I hope he is released soon. Hugs

    Liked by 2 people

    • davidprosser says:

      Thanks so much Scottie, I suppose being on death row all that time must take it’s toll too. I’m thrilled at the news that he could possibly soon be free, cleared and able to return home. What”s hard is that some of those who put him there may never face justice themselves.
      Hugs

      Liked by 2 people

  2. jilldennison says:

    Thanks so much for this heartening update!!! Far too little, too late, but still …
    Cwtch

    Liked by 2 people

    • davidprosser says:

      Thanks Jill. I hope soon Kris will be able to return home free and cleared of all charges. I doubt he can ever put it all behind him though.At least he will be able to enjoy the company of his wife not limited to the whims of someone else.
      Cwtch

      Liked by 3 people

      • jilldennison says:

        True, but … that he spent nearly half of his life in prison, that he is unlikely to see many more years, is such injustice. It makes my blood boil. I hope he does get out soon and that he at least finds some pleasure in life. In many of these cases, the state compensates them (if, in fact, one can be said to be compensated for years or decades of their lives). I sincerely hope they have to give Kris enough to live out his remaining days in luxury! Sigh.
        Cwtch

        Liked by 2 people

      • davidprosser says:

        I sincerely hope that’s the case but haven’t certain states now made it a policy not to give compensation in wrongful imprisonment cases? Even when it’s proved that an officer of the law was anything but and gave false testimony. I don’t know why Kris was out there but I hope he comes home once he’s released though he might prefer the warmth.
        Cwtch

        Liked by 2 people

      • jilldennison says:

        I believe he was incarcerated in Florida? They have a policy of $50,000 per year, with a cap of $2 million. However, there are criteria that must be met, and there is no guarantee. Here’s a chart of how each state handles compensation for exonerees https://www.innocenceproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Adeles_Compensation-Chart_Version-2017.pdf As for Kris … if I were him, I would want to get out of this country as quickly as possible. The U.S. is not a good place to be, and we have certainly done him no favours. Sigh.
        Cwtch

        Liked by 1 person

  3. jilldennison says:

    Reblogged this on Filosofa's Word and commented:
    You guys remember last week when I re-blogged David’s post about Kris Maharaj, who has been serving a sentence on death row for 33 years, for a crime he did NOT commit? Well, today David received some good news, and I wanted to share it with you as well!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. rawgod says:

    I am very happy to hear this is moving forward, but it scares me there is no guarantee he will be released. And it concerns me how many more cases such as this that we do not know about and probably never will. The “rush to justice” America is so famous for is a fertile field for injustices such as these. I am not saying other nations are not complicit in also rushing to justice, Canada has been caught guilty of convicting the wrong person many times, but given the racist climate in the States some juries are more willing to disregard those facts which do not support the prosecution’s claims.
    I am not saying there was any racism in this case, but there have been many in which race is a major factor. This is why I hate the criminal justice system, wherever it reigns.

    Liked by 2 people

    • davidprosser says:

      I really don’t know what the evidentiary hearing can do, whether they can declare there has been a miscarriage of justice and release Kris or whether it has to go before a panel who decide what to do. What I do know is racism is probably there in all manner of cases and it”s the difference between a heavy fine for a white person and 5 years jail for a POC. It works the other way too. My son in law is black and is a great lad but his brother is very prejudiced against whites.Maybe with reason? But Kris was innocent and that’s been known since at least 2014 so 5 more years in prison before anyone moves.The criminal justice system is nor perfect and it could certainly e improved when it comes to ccases like this, but what else do we have?

      Hugs

      Liked by 1 person

      • rawgod says:

        For starters, switch to restorative justice and get rid of punitive justice. Punitive justice helps no one, victims, their families, criminals, their families, or society at large. It desroys rather than rehabilitates. Restorative justice helps everyone to understand, and hopefully learn why living together and sharing is much better than creating inequalities and injustices, keeping individuals apart from others.
        As for fixing the justice system, throw the whole thing out and start over, from the ground up. Punitive justice has been around as long as civilization, and it has never worked for society as a whole. But no one cares.
        “Vengeance is mine,” sayeth the lord. Humans get nothing from vengeance, only more hatred.

        Liked by 3 people

      • davidprosser says:

        Vengeance is mine sayeth man since I don’t believe in a lord to hang the blame on. Restorative Justice used to be where the criminal or the murderer compensated the wronged family. That would only work these days if wealthy people committed the crimes. I’m happy with the idea of ending jails and having people in communities of respect for each other, I’m even prepared to try it again but what happens to those people with the chemical imbalance that keeps them committing crimes. I hope the world you want can come about and we can end the vicious cycle of revenge we have.
        Hugs

        Liked by 1 person

      • rawgod says:

        Restorative justice is more than re compensating the victim or the victim’s family, and it can be used for all crimes, not just murder. I don’t know all the finer points ofrestoratve justice, but I do know each case is decided on its own merits, with consequences suited to the victimizers abiluties. It is widely used in First Nations’ communities in Canada, and works very well for them. No one goes to jail, but understanding of every side is the goal, and responsibility taken for offences. And everyone gets treated with respect.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. inavukic says:

    Sadness and anger overwhelm. Lives ruined. Thank you for sharing this David, it’s a reminder to all to keep fighting the bastard that can live within the justice system. God bless! ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  6. colettebytes says:

    So, fingers crossed for a release. 🤞
    I wonder if he will ever feel like he has had anything like a normal life after this gross injustice. Hepefully, he can adjust to a non-institutionalised life where he has to make his own decisions? I am sure his wife will be the pillar of support, but after all that time incarcerated (not knowing when he will die), he will find life outside prison quite a challenge.
    Nice update though… ❤️🤗 Hugs David… 😊

    Liked by 2 people

    • davidprosser says:

      You’re so right Colette, life outside will have changed so much that on Television you won’t get the full idea. His life will be one of trying to be spontaneous instead of regimented. I think he’s a very lucky man that his wife stuck by him as he’s going to need her support but let’s hope whatever time he has left will be happy and comfortable.
      Massive Hugs Colette.xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Thank you for your hard work:
    Matthew 25 King James’ Version:
    34Then the King will say to those on His right hand, ‘Come, you blessed of My Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world:
    35for I was hungry and you gave Me food; I was thirsty and you gave Me drink; I was a stranger and you took Me in;
    36I was naked and you clothed Me; I was sick and you visited Me; I was in prison and you came to Me.’

    Like

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