Modern Day Slavery.

Eritrea is a small African country in the North East or Horn of Africa. It’s Capital is Asmara. After the Second World War Eritrea was taken away from the Italians and administered by the British until 1952. At that time the UN General Assembly voted to make Eritrea self governing but tied to Ethiopia it’s larger neighbour for a period of ten years. In 1962 the Government of Ethiopia annulled the agreement and tried to annexe Eritrea bringing about armed resistance from the Eritreans and they proved to be difficult to defeat. In 1991 after almost 30 years continual warfare Eritrea got it’s wish. Or did it? It became a one party state under the EPLF which later became the People’s Front for Democracy. In itself, if this didn’t make me laugh I’d have to cry. National  legislative elections have been postponed time and again.

The Government of Eritrea has been accused of some of the worst Human Rights abuses in the World with arbitrary arrests and detentions. Freedom of speech and freedom to assemble are limited and the press has been placed at the bottom of a list of 180 countries and there is no private press in Eritrea.I’m sure by now you think I have no point to make, but here it is. A steady flow of Eritreans want to leave the country and head for Europe ( to the countries that pillaged their own in the past). They leave Eritrea after paying smugglers.and get to Rama in Ethiopia then go on from Rama to Omdurman in the Sudan (where Gordon fought the Mahdi ). From Rama to Chad and on to Tripoli in Libya. The journey is fraught with perils as there are plenty of slavers about but for now these people are safe in Tripoli.

Only they’re not safe. Once there they’re handed over to someone else to complete the journey to the West only to find they’ve been sold. More money is demanded to help them complete their journey with torture and severe beatings while the subject is force to make a phone call back to Eritrea for money. Those that can’t get it may be tortured some more then sold on again or may just be murdered. When the ‘lucky’ ones get more money they’re moved on, but very often just to continue the process of being bought and sold. While in the camps they’re very often not fed and when they are it may be a piece of bread.

We know this slavery goes on.My question is this, “Why do we let it?”  Libya has gone to pot since Ghaddafi  fell which had an awful lot to do with the machinations of the Western powers. Satellite imagery should be good enough to spot these slave camps and I’m sure troops could be helicoptered in there from an adjoining friendly nation to rescue the slaves and take the slavers in . It should work provided no money is changing hands between the slavers and members of the Government who know when an operation is happening. Whatever way it could be done and I’m sure there are many other theories of a better way, it should be done rather than leave these already desperate people in the hands of the slavers.

Massive Hugs to all.

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About davidprosser

Retired Local Government Officer who started to write at age 60 and hasn't looked back. Writes a humorous diary on the life of a member of the gentry.......and the village he lives in with his sadistic early morning alarm cat Oscar and his wife the formidable Lady J.
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26 Responses to Modern Day Slavery.

  1. jilldennison says:

    Many thanks to you, David, for this post. This is but one of many situations around the globe that is so under-reported that most citizens of the Western world are completely unaware that it even exists. Like you, I believe that with coordinated effort between the United Nations and nations in the free world, there must be a solution, a way to save these lives. Awareness is the first step, and you have taken that step. And I will take another small step in sharing your excellent work.
    Cwtch

    Liked by 1 person

  2. jilldennison says:

    Reblogged this on Filosofa's Word and commented:
    Early this morning, I wrote a short piece sharing my angst over the fact that I have been so wrapped up in writing about U.S. politics that I had missed a couple of very serious issues that deserved attention. At that moment, tired and sad, I saw this as an egregious failure on my part. Our friend David, however, one of the greatest humanitarians I know, picked up that ball and ran with it, writing of one of the issues I had let fall through the cracks: the slave trade on the African continent. Please take a few moments to read David’s enlightening and informative post, for the first step in solving this humanitarian crisis is awareness, and far too many of us are unaware what goes on outside our own corner of the world. Thank you, David, for bringing our attention to this massive atrocity.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My comment is not meant to be facetious or smug, but what’s in it for the USA? Oil? Ores? Natural resources? We all know by now that USA does not get involved unless there’s a payoff. Why are we in Syria, why do we support Saudi Arabia, one of the most repressive regimes in the world? On the other hand why have we not rebuilt Puerto Rico?

    Like

    • davidprosser says:

      I think that’s often been the case for other countries too Larry. Under your current President I’d say the question is quite valid but he won’t be there forever and the next incumbent of the throne may be much more a humanitarian with no taste for repression and might prefer rebuilding Puerto Rico to building a new golf course funded by foreign banks. In the meantime maybe Europe could step up to the plate, it’s not like they’re ignorant of the problem, or any of the others faced by the World not least Saudi Arabia which they tell us is still supposed to keep it out of the hands of the militant fundamentalists. If we push enough maybe we can be the change in the world.
      Hugs

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Great post, David. Why in blazes did the UN not follow up after creating this country in 1952? We really need a world government to replace the ridiculous national governments that have inflicted untold suffering in the world for centuries.

    Liked by 3 people

    • davidprosser says:

      Great question John. They thought they were doing Eritrea a favour back in 52 linking it to a stronger, established Government for help but weren’t prepared for the attempted annexation or the years of war that followed. Just like Ethiopia weren’t ready for the three major defeats it suffered at the hands of little Eritrea when it tried invading. I doubt the UN were too welcome in 1991 when the fighting all but ended.Maybe you’re right and a One World Government is what’s needed now which can come down hard and fast on breaches.
      Hugs

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks for writing this and bringing it to my attention.

    Like

  6. rawgod says:

    Horrible to say, but worrying about situations like this is a lot more important than worrying about whether Trump tweets another lie today or not.
    So where do we start? I don’t suppose there are any slave traders we can boycott so they run out of funds to carry on their inhumanity? Nor can we send their victims food and medicine to help them survive when we know that food and medicine will never reach its intended targets. I guess with the right negotiators we could buy them from the traders, but the price would quickly become prohibitive. Still, it might free a few lucky people before the bad guys realize what is going on. But how, as free people, can we really make a dent in what is going on?
    Violence is one way, but then we would just be proving we are as bad as the traders are. We need a peaceful, yet successful way to stop this. And while this is not ideal, especially for those already in the slave traps, we need to interrupt this process before it starts. We need to help emigrants (refugees) from Eritrea, or anywhere, to leave their countries of origin safely, with definite places of safety to go to, where they will not be subjected to the greed of the inhumane.
    I am not saying I know how to do this, my expertise is not in the workings of foreign governments or just other nations, but I am saying there has to be a way in, in order to get potential victims safely out.

    Like

    • davidprosser says:

      Hi Rawgod, there’s nothing you say I don’t agree with except that sometimes violence ( I hate violence) is necessary and the only option. I don’t think it makes us as bad as the slavers who may serve long prison sentences but at least they won’t be tortured and will be fed. Maybe when they are released there will be no refugees left, no slaves in service. As you say, the ideal way is to make sure there are no refugees or emigrants for them to take and the only way for that to happen is by persuading Eritrea to have free elections to form a true Democratic homeland that people won’t want to leave. Unfortunately I think there will always be those refused permission to enter another county legally who will try the illegal method making things easy for slavers. Like you I’m not sure how to solve these problems, certainly not easily but I don’t think they should be ignored either when human life is so cheap to the slavers.
      Hugs

      Like

      • rawgod says:

        I personally do not think violence is ever necessary, but that is just my opinion. But then, it is also my opinion incarceration serves no purpose other than punishment, and few if any people ever learn anything good through punishment. Each to their own, but the very first thing I would do if ever I became leader of a country would be to raze every jail, gaol, prison, or penitentiary in existence. But since I will never be made leader of a country, the point is moot.
        The last thing I would try to do in Eritrea is try to monkey with its politics in order to get people to stay there. If they want to leave for whatever reason, that is their choice. Just because you are born in a country does not mean you have to stay there, or should even want to stay there…
        But definitely something needs to be done, and I think I have given a good starting point. Now we need to find someone who can do something about it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • davidprosser says:

        Sometimes violence isn’t a choice but a necessity. If you came on a group of slaves being killed so they couldn’t identify the slavers violence may be the only option to save innocent lives. I agree with your opinion that incarceration rarely does any good. Sometimes there are other options like having someone tagged an paying their debt with voluntary work where needed.There are though many criminals whom society has to be protected from. Incarceration may be the only viable alternative for them.
        In Eritrea I think if they had a free Government them people wanting to leave can go through the official channels without fear of retribution. I certainly wouldn’t suggest someone be forced to stay in a country just because they were born there.I think the options are much better for them, and they may not need to leave if they live in a well governed country without fear.
        Yes, something needs to be done in a lot of places and we need someone able to bring it about. Since my offer of being Benevolent Dictator to the world was rejected, it won’t be me either.
        Hugs

        Like

      • rawgod says:

        Methinks I probably protest too much, but I have no use for democracy as it is practised on Earth, just like I have no use for Communism as it is practised on Earth. I think we may have had this discussion before, but in my mind no government is the only government I can live with.
        Peace to all.

        Liked by 1 person

      • davidprosser says:

        I don’t know whether we’ve had this argument before but we’ve obviously not let it stop us talking if so. I tend to agree with your statements regarding Democracy and Communism. America and Russia are proof of the pudding, but where we might differ is in no Government at all. I don’t like chaos.
        Peace and Hugs to you.

        Like

      • rawgod says:

        Lol. I love chaos, it allows us to do new things in new ways. And it necessitates change.
        Meanwhile, I don’t like the wird argument, it sounds violent to me. Conversation, or discussion, those are words that infer calmness and respect. While I don’t agree with everything you say, I do agree with much of it. Our basic thoughts on humane living are quite similar, so the rest doesn’t matter.

        Like

  7. Keith says:

    David, thank you for the illumination. There is so much going on that is underreported here because the US President sucking all the oxygen out of the room. What is going on Yemen with US support is awful. Your coverage of this is the first time I have been made aware. Thanks for keeping us better informed. Keith

    Liked by 1 person

    • davidprosser says:

      Thank you for taking the time to read this Keith. I know exactly what you mean about The Yemen and in Libya too. I know even better how it’s difficult to do much more than function in Trump’s America. I really feel for you and my fingers are crossed that the mid-terms will change the status quo and take away his support.
      Hugs

      Like

      • Keith says:

        Thanks David. I was heartened that is disapproval rate has it 60% with strong disapproval at 53%. His remaining supporters who do not realize they have been lied to. It may not occur before the mid-terms, but many of his actions – tariffs, bullying allies, making healthcare more expensive, curtailing immigration, curtailing guests, and making debt worse and now cutting raises for 2 million federal workers – will start hampering the economy. Keith

        Liked by 1 person

      • davidprosser says:

        He’s really not chosen the ideal time to make all these changes has he. Even though cancelling the pay rises is for 2019, it’s this year he detailed the loss. Two million more people to remember at the polls. His remaining supporters ill have to recognise his lies eventually as ‘The Wall’ isn’t going to appear any more than are jobs and a great economy.
        Have a god weekend.
        Hugs

        Like

  8. Gronda Morin says:

    Dear David,

    Thank you for shining a light on this African country Eritrea. It was US lawmakers like Senator McCain who would have taken on this case, personally.

    But the current US President could give a damn about human rights’ abuses and violations. In case you didn’t know, Russia is playing footsies with Eritea along with Saudi Arabia, and of course these countries will not be demanding reforms.

    As per an 8/31/18 Reuters report, “Russia is set to make investments in a port in Eritrea as Moscow enters talks to set up a logistics centre in the Horn of Africa nation.”

    “RIA news agency cited Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov as disclosing the move on Friday during a meeting with his Eritrean counterpart Osman Saleh.”

    “Lavrov said the project would help develop bilateral trade, the agency reported. It did not name the port,” a Reuters report added. Eritrea’s known port are at Massawa and Assab. A recent report by Bloomberg quoted a mines official hinting of a possibility of developing another port for potash export.”

    “In speaking after meetings held in Sochi, Lavrov said: “We undoubtedly would like to thank you (Eritrea) for the close coordination of our approaches at the UN and other international venues.”

    “An Eritrean delegation – comprising Saleh and presidential advisor Yemane Ghebreab – are on an official visit to Russia. They arrived on Thursday and will end their engagements on September 1.”

    “Eritrea has been on a renewed diplomatic engagement since President Isaias Afwerki signed a peace deal with Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy hmed in July 2018.”

    “Ethiopia and Eritrea in July agreed to jointly develop ports on Eritrea’s Red Sea coast, Ethiopia’s state broadcaster said a day after the leaders met and agreed to normalize relations after a 20-year military standoff.”

    As per a 8/6/18 AfricanNews.com report, “An Eritrean delegation led by Foreign Minister Osman Saleh on Sunday arrived in Saudi Arabia for a visit aimed at deepening relations between the two countries.”

    “According to Eritrea’s Information Minister, Yemane Meskel, “Both sides further discussed the recent developments in the Horn of Africa, especially peace and friendship between Eritrea and Ethiopia.”

    “He added that the Adel Jubeir confirmed that Saudi Arabia was ready to make its own contributions to consolidating the peace.”

    “The two sides also dilated in the recent Eritrea-Somali peace talks that saw both countries restore all friendly and diplomatic ties stressing that it will help Somalia overcome its challenges.”

    “Eritrean president Isaias Afwerki was in Saudi two weeks ago on the invitation of King Salman. Both leaders also discussed similar issues. Saleh was part of Afwerki’s delegation then and this meeting is believed to be aimed at consolidating the talks.”

    These two developments do not signal that human rights’ improvements are in the cards for Eritea. These two countries have President Trump in their pockets which means he won’t do a damn thing to stop this extreme case of “human trafficking. But this needs international widespread media coverage. Thanks for writing this post.

    Hugs, Gronda

    Like

    • davidprosser says:

      Dear Gronda, the sheer stupidity of the West takes my breath away.They allowed the war between Eritrea and Ethiopia to go on too long. The UN should have been there putting a stop to it and ensuring fair elections for a Democratic Government then the whole of this mess might have been avoided.Now, a regime with no interest in Human Rights will be tied up with Russia who won’t care as there’s is no better. Ethiopia will be drawn into this pact.
      Saudi Arabia talking t Russia, possible goodbye to The West so King Salman can go back to his terrible human rights record just when some thought it was improving. Not enough for us but maybe to much for his ministers and Imams.No-one will push too much with Russia in the picture.
      Thanks for your comment
      Hugs

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I have been constantly bemused by politics in Africa, and I sometimes think that pretensions to democracy are worse than religious pretensions in bringing endless civil strife. So many thousands in this world die for unwinnable causes! As for the West, I maybe think that reluctance to involve ourselves enough, which would mean maybe occupation on a similar level to that of the British in Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia), is limited by the lack of financial motive, not for lack of conscience, but precisely because we have a democratic system which holds the governing party to account at its next election.
    Anyway, helping trafficking victims? I don’t know, David. Where does it end? I just see us getting into more trouble. I don’t think we willingly wash our hands, I think we see the tide washing over us – we just can’t encompass a solution to something so vast. King Canute. Hugs, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • davidprosser says:

      You could well be right Frederick, my want to plunge headlong into righting every wrong may well be out of place in a Country that holds the governing party to account at elections. It’s well an good to save the World but not at the cost of bankrupting the Country because there’s no monetary gain or sweet trade deal at the end. Of course I don’t think it’s just we who should be putting a stop to these problems. I think it’s the responsibility of every right thinking Country, and that perhaps a NATO response spreads the costs.
      This a time where the world should regret not accepting my offer to be a Benevolent Dictator.
      Hugs Frederick

      Liked by 1 person

  10. No, David, you carry on plunging! Voices need to be raised, and my fatalistic attitude achieves nothing. I only wish there was more food, and more room, and everybody could learn to live together. Personally, I regret the physical limitations that stopped me from becoming a beauty queen, and then I could have declared my wish for ‘world peace’. Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

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